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Streaming for genome research


It had taken almost 13 years, in 2003 the time had come: the human genome was decoded. The gigantic project swallowed up about three billion dollars. But from now on it was possible to investigate hereditary and infectious diseases as well as the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis in greater depth.


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Big Data against the Norovirus


Sudden nausea, violent vomiting, diarrhoea: Noroviruses are responsible for the majority of gastrointestinal infections (gastroenteritis). They are highly infectious and can cause acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in community facilities, hospitals, retirement homes or on cruise ships.
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Case management systems: Tool or already actor?


Digital technologies are often described as tools. The idea is that digital tools support users in organizations in a variety of ways: They help to make better and safer decisions, facilitate networking and cooperation and support us in coping with complexity. In a way, the tool is waiting to be used. The crux of the matter is that the talk of digital tools is misguided because it assumes that users are the real actors.
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Better understanding and treatment of autoimmune diseases


A constantly dry mouth and the feeling of having grains of sand in one's eye are symptoms of primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), an autoimmune disease that damages the body's salivary and lacrimal glands. In addition to a variety of other symptoms, the complication is an increased risk of lymph gland cancer. Why and how Sjögren's syndrome occurs is still being researched.

 


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Big data for better hearing


Hearing loss is the most common chronic neurosensory disease. In industrialized countries, more than 17 percent of the population is affected - with a considerable reduction in quality of life and even social isolation. In cases of mild to moderate hearing impairment, hearing aids can usually compensate for this deficit. However, only hearing implants can help with moderate and especially severe hearing loss. They assume the function of the cochlea in the inner ear.
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Language assistants for hospitals


Whether patient care or more efficient procedures and communication processes: The use of digital technology offers many opportunities for improvement in everyday hospital life. But the work in the hospital is not an office job - at least not only. The digitisation of work organisation therefore faces particular challenges.


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On the way to individual therapy


Every human being is genetically unique. Nevertheless, the treatment of diseases is still not very individual. Even individual genetic variants can reduce the effectiveness of a therapy. Individual treatment therefore requires genetic testing and analysis of specific genetic variations that may affect a patient's suitability for a particular drug.
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Listen and understand


Everyone knows it: you meet with friends in a restaurant and despite the conversations of other guests it is easy to understand each other. What is natural for people with normal hearing is a major problem for people with a cochlear implant (CI).

 


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Understanding biofilms, preventing infections


Some bacteria like to live in community. They settle together on surfaces and surround themselves with a protective layer of slime. Such a biofilm can also form on organs and implants, such as knee and hip prostheses or dental and cochlear implants. There, the bacteria can trigger dangerous infections that are hardly treatable. In the mucus layer, the bacteria are protected from attacks by the immune system and even from the effects of antibiotics.
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Insight into data analysis


Traffic jams and overcrowded lanes at peak times, looking for a parking space or unexpected construction sites: The city traffic can get on your nerves. The increasing availability of data and new analysis methods could make life easier for road users in the future.


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